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In-Box Review
135
British SF with Support troops
British Special Forces with Support Troops Afghanistan
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by: Darren Baker [ CMOT ]


Originally published on:
Armorama

Introduction

This offering from Gecko Models, provides six troops that offer the modeller a diorama in a box. This set would also make a nice addition to the British ATMP with rescue stretcher, released at the same time and also available from Gecko Models.

Review

This product from Gecko Models, is provided in the usual end opening carton, with art work on it as seen from most manufacturers. The packaging is further enhanced as inside there is a cardboard tray with flip top lid, inside of which there are seven zip lock bags and one sealed plastic bags. This provides the offering with an A level of protection that some others could learn from.

This offering from Gecko Models consists of no less than six figures. It would appear to represent two special forces soldiers due to good replication of facial hair, one of these has been wounded or fallen ill, and is in the process of being treated by two field medics. The other two figures are engaged with communications trying to arrange an e-vac from the area. An examination of the sprues does not reveal any areas of concern, beyond the expected levels of clean up. Each of the figures is on their own sprue, making parts location easy.

Uniform detail is of a good quality, with good crease details shown where needed. Items such as knee pads, are provided separately as are the side panels of the body armour. Looking at this offering from Gecko Models I was very pleased until I noticed that the torso of the wounded individual is missing, and due to the efforts taken in the packaging from Gecko Models this must have occurred in the factory. I am sure that a replacement part, can be obtained but that will take a little while to arrive. While talking of the injured party who I consider to be the central character, he is presented with a splinted left leg, looking at the instruction manual the torso has good muscle definition and is receiving fluids via an intravenous drip. The other bearded individual is holding the bag of fluids being administered to the injured party. One of the medics treating the casualty appears to be preparing an injection while the other seems to be communicating with the injured party.

Moving to the communications team, there is an item provided here, that would test anyone who struggles with photo etch. A satellite communications aerial which requires no less than seven photo etch pieces, these need to be fed on to a metal bar that needs to be sourced by the modeller. The weapons provided in this offering consists of L119A1 rifles, with and without under slung grenade launcher and two further with a forward hand grip fitted and the possibility of a light fitted. There are L22A rifles, glock 17 pistols and sig 226 pistols. These pistols are provided holstered and unholstered. The last really nice part of these rifles is that photo etch slings have been provided for them, and how to mount them on the rifles is well covered. All of the necessary items such as the ammunition bags, camels packs etc, are provided and meet my expectations of them and Gecko models. I like that in this offering medical equipment is provided in an open back pack, revealing items that are identifiable and this attribute will look really good with careful painting.

The instruction manual covers construction of the figures via photographs of the actual plastic figures. Painting of the weapons is covered to a good standard, and painting of the camouflage of the bags and packs is covered via images of the actual items, and a photograph of DDPM which will make painting an easier task. The finish of the set is completed via the addition of supplied decals, which included both types of countries forces patches and the roles of the troops depicted.

Conclusion

I will not deny that finding a piece missing from this offering is disappointing, but knowing that Gecko Models have a good reputation, a replacement part will be along in time. This figure set is very much a complete package; due to the inclusion of photo etch and decals for the figures and weapons, and that all of the figures work together in a single setting. As regards faults, I canít say there are any, beyond the missing part and the packaging quality deserves praise.
SUMMARY
Darren Baker takes a look at the British Special Forces with Support Troops Afghanistan in 1/35th scale from Gecko Models.
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: 35GM0023
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Nov 06, 2020
  NATIONALITY: United Kingdom
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.04%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 83.00%

Our Thanks to Gecko Models!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Darren Baker (CMOT)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I have been building model kits since the early 70ís starting with Airfix kits of mostly aircraft, then progressing to the point I am at now building predominantly armour kits from all countries and time periods. Living in the middle of Salisbury plain since the 70ís, I have had lots of opportunitie...

Copyright ©2021 text by Darren Baker [ CMOT ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of KitMaker Network or the British Bulldogs IPMS-UK group. All rights reserved.



Comments

As always, excellent review! I have the set down in the workshop, Darren. The casualty's torso is quite well done, Gecko had someone who had definitely done their homework on TCCC (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) involved with this - the casualty has a sternal IO IV access port. An IO IV, is an interosseous IV, literally into a bone; there are videos on YouTube of the sternal IOs being placed in a TCCC class. Yes, we did practice on each other, it was a way to teach empathy with the patient; it also taught you differences in anatomy from person to person. As a corpsman the only short coming I see with the medical gear is the IV bag, it would benefit from being done in clear plastic/resin. That is a very minor thing and easily remedied, you also need to come up with something to represent IV tubing (invisible thread or thin fishing line). Just my .02 though.
NOV 08, 2020 - 02:49 AM
   

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