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Protective covers to build models on?
GregCopplin
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United States
Joined: September 06, 2011
KitMaker: 144 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 0 posts
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 03:49 PM UTC
Whatís your guys recommendation for covers when it comes to building and painting models. Does anyone make a special cutting board or Matt to build on so as to not damage the surface of the table you build on?
Scarred
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,129 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 0 posts
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 05:05 PM UTC
Just get a self healing cutting mat. You can find them at Wal-Mart in the arts and craft section or order one online. Make sure you get one big enough to cover you work area.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 2,923 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 1 posts
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 05:37 PM UTC
For the last 15 years, I've done all my work on a 46"x24" sheet of 1/4" tempered glass that fits over my workbench. I'm careful not to drop anything heavy on it, and the glass has held up well. When not in use, I cover it with thin cardboard. Paint and glue (even CA) can be scraped off with a razor blade or wiped off easily. It's impervious to all glues, all types of paint, is easy to keep clean, and perfectly level. I use sheets of light colored construction paper underneath the glass, or I can place photos, instructions, or plans under the glass for quick reference. I can cut tape, separate small parts, solder and even slice styrene on my glass top. I've chipped the glass on the edge once, and the Speedy Glass folks (where I bought it) fixed it for free (they simply ground the damaged edge down by 1/16"). I also use a small cutting pad for heavy work, and just to keep things neat, I have a smaller piece of picture frame glass with a cork backing I use for creating pools of CA for large glue jobs. I can even do light hammering (as in using a punch) on my bench glass as long as there is a cutting mat underneath the work. I paid $27 for my glass bench top in 2004, and it's been worth every penny. I highly recommend it, but make sure you buy "tempered" glass at least 1/4" thick. Other types of glass can easily crack.
VR, Russ
GregCopplin
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United States
Joined: September 06, 2011
KitMaker: 144 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 0 posts
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 05:41 PM UTC

Quoted Text

For the last 15 years, I've done all my work on a 46"x24" sheet of 1/4" tempered glass that fits over my workbench. I'm careful not to drop anything heavy on it, and the glass has held up well. When not in use, I cover it with thin cardboard. Paint and glue (even CA) can be scraped off with a razor blade or wiped off easily. It's impervious to all glues, all types of paint, is easy to keep clean, and perfectly level. I use sheets of light colored construction paper underneath the glass, or I can place photos, instructions, or plans plans under the glass for quick reference. I can cut tape, separate small parts, solder and even slice styrene on my glass top. I've chipped the glass on the edge once, and the Speedy Glass folks (where I bought it) fixed it for free. I also use a small cutting pad, and just to keep things neat, I have a smaller piece of picture frame glass with a cork backing I use for creating a pool of CA for large glue jobs. I can even do light hammering (as in using a punch) on my bench glass as long as there is a cutting mat underneath the work. I paid $27 for my glass bench top in 2004, and it's been worth every penny. I highly recommend it, but make sure you buy tempered glass at least 1/4" thick. Other types of glass can easily crack.
VR, Russ


Thatís an interesting concept Iíve always been afraid to build and cut on glass. I always assumed itíd shatter on me. Weíre getting a new desk here so Iím gonna ask the wife if sheís okay with a glass covering for it. It sounds like itís be worth every penny as youíd said. I also ran across some self healing cutting boards but wasnít sure what would be best.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 2,923 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 1 posts
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 06:00 PM UTC
Greg, I forgot to add that my modeling workbench is in a 3 car unheated garage. I have a heavy duty tool bench right next to it, that I do automotive, household or garden type work on, so that's the "heavy lifting bench". The hobby bench repairs jewelry for my wife, electronic soldering, building models, and light repair work of all types.The glass is held in place by 5" sides and back, and a 1/4" lip at the front (keeps it from sliding, although it's heavy enough it doesn't move much). Since it's in the unheated garage, and winters can get cold where I live, I have a separate 26"x18" piece of tempered glass that I move indoors and use on my wife's sewing desk (when she's not using it). This is a more portable glass top I can move around to where I need it. If you stick with tempered 1/4" glass, it will be rugged enough for most work. If you're using it on a desk, I recommend getting a slightly smaller piece than the desk top-- whatever you do, don't let it overhang the edge of the desk, as that can lead to damaged edges. And make sure the glass folks grind the edges so they aren't sharp.
VR, Russ
Vicious
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Queensland, Australia
Joined: September 04, 2015
KitMaker: 1,412 posts
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Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 06:25 PM UTC
I have a self healing cutting mat size A1 and after my old printer/scanner died I took a part ,a lot of good stuff inside there springs,cables,electric motors and a nice thin A3 glass sheet very handy for cutting tape etc...
GregCopplin
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United States
Joined: September 06, 2011
KitMaker: 144 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 - 01:14 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Greg, I forgot to add that my modeling workbench is in a 3 car unheated garage. I have a heavy duty tool bench right next to it, that I do automotive, household or garden type work on, so that's the "heavy lifting bench". The hobby bench repairs jewelry for my wife, electronic soldering, building models, and light repair work of all types.The glass is held in place by 5" sides and back, and a 1/4" lip at the front (keeps it from sliding, although it's heavy enough it doesn't move much). Since it's in the unheated garage, and winters can get cold where I live, I have a separate 26"x18" piece of tempered glass that I move indoors and use on my wife's sewing desk (when she's not using it). This is a more portable glass top I can move around to where I need it. If you stick with tempered 1/4" glass, it will be rugged enough for most work. If you're using it on a desk, I recommend getting a slightly smaller piece than the desk top-- whatever you do, don't let it overhang the edge of the desk, as that can lead to damaged edges. And make sure the glass folks grind the edges so they aren't sharp.
VR, Russ


Ahh yeah i dont have a permanent place as i move around every few years form my job. But Iíll keep this suggestion for when we do finally have a house and garage.
2002hummer
#257
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: October 11, 2011
KitMaker: 730 posts
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Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 - 04:44 AM UTC
Russ That sounds like a great idea. You mentioned that you got the glass at Speedy Auto Glass. i did not think that they did flat glass. I will have to check in on them for a piece. Not as big as yours but I will try them.
Scarred
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 1,129 posts
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Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 - 04:55 AM UTC
If you got one of those tv/audio cabinets with glass doors you don't use anymore or you know somebody who does use those. They're usually tempered glass and often darkened. I got rid of one of those years ago and used the glass on my hobby table under my cutting mat. It's dark glass so little light colored pieces of PE or plastic are easy to see.
justsendit
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Colorado, United States
Joined: February 24, 2014
KitMaker: 2,830 posts
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Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 - 05:20 AM UTC
As for self-healing mats, I've been using this version for several years and it's held up very well:
UESTA A1 (36L x 24W inch) (900 x 600 mm) Self Healing 5 Layers PVC Colorful Cutting Mat.

I'm kinda' partial to the blue color, as it is easy on my eyes (other colors available). The large 36 x 24 inch size offers plenty of elbow-room and I find the grids to be extremely helpful. HTH.

ómike
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 2,923 posts
IPMS-UK KitMaker Branch: 1 posts
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 - 05:32 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Russ That sounds like a great idea. You mentioned that you got the glass at Speedy Auto Glass. i did not think that they did flat glass. I will have to check in on them for a piece. Not as big as yours but I will try them.



Darrell
Yes, we have a local Speedy Glass in the small town I live in-- and they do all sorts of glass work, including mirrors, and different colored glass panels. They also do auto glass, including chip repair and total replacement. Our small Speedy Glass also does maritime glass, since it's located in a fishing town. I find they are less expensive than specialized "window" glass stores. The suggestion of using old TV cabinet glass or computer printer glass (I have several smaller pieces from old printers I use as portable surfaces) above is also a good one too, these are almost always tempered glass. For large surfaces, I prefer "custom orders" sometimes, Speedy Glass will sell a chunk of glass which is a "second" from some other job. And you can get it in larger thicknesses if needed, but I find 1/4" about perfect for a workbench.
VR, Russ